African presence in the americas before columbus

One of his prime tasks must be the research, resurrection, and dissemination of information about the long suppressed contributions Africans in Africa and the diaspora have made toward the development of world civilization.

African presence in the americas before columbus

The reason is the content of education, textbooks, religious teachings and the Bible itself had been controlled for years by Europeans.

Sometimes this point of view obscures reality. There were some recent finds which might indicate an error in our translation of history. Sometimes we are so reluctant to change our way of thinking that we need overwelming evidence, far beyond a reasonable doubt.

This article will attempt to lay the foundation for African presence in the Americas before the arrival of Columbus, not as slaves, but as explorers and traders who helped to build the Olmec civilization. This line of thinking is not new. He is a Harvard graduate and thought to be the originator of the idea even though he did not have all of the recently discovered facts necessary to support his theory.

Later inHarold G. Lawrence wrote African Explorers of the New World. He believed that Mandigos from the Mali and Songhay Empires carried on trade with the natives of the Americas. These are just a few of the historians who support this theory. There are many more. The leading researcher on this subject today is Ivan Van Sertima, who has written several books on the subject.

Van Sertima is a professor at Rutgers University. A New World View of Many historians deny this Pre-Columbian African Presence, and believe ignoring it is the best way to deal with it, except for Micheal Coe and Ignacio Bernal. They chose to take a stance against the presence and wrote several books on the subject.

African presence in the americas before columbus

Christopher Columbus is believed to have discovered the New World, his route was not a straight westerly route as one might expect. His route consisted of four legs. The first leg took him southwest to the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa.

After arriving at the Islands he changed sails from a lateen sail to a square sail. The lateen sail was designed to tack against the wind. The square sail could only sail with a following or side wind, but it was stronger and faster with less wind.

Module 1 Comment on the claims that Nordic and West African people came to the Americas before ColuThe West Africans: The West Africans: As early as the s, Leo Weiner, the originator of the thoughts that Africans made the journey before Columbus, gave evidence to support his ideas. Many cultural parallels have emerged that point to the presence of Africans in the Western Hemisphere well before Christopher Columbus accidentally encountered the Americas in African Presence in Ancient America before Columbus This video’s purpose is to stress to Africans in America and the world that our history did not start with slavery in the New World. The Ancient Ancestors of.

This change would only have been performed if you knew you had a following or a side wind. This indicates that Columbus received feedback from someone who traveled this route before.

If he had gone west from Spain he would have encountered head winds the entire trip. The third and fourth leg returned him along a northern route home.

So why did he travel to Africa? Other previous expeditions led by Europeans and or Vikings, traveled northwest. These facts are a strong indication that Columbus was aware of the winds and the currents off the coast of Africa. These facts are still disputed by some historians. Trade Winds and currents.

In the Atlantic Ocean there are currents and winds that move in the same direction all year round with little variation. These currents and winds are strong enough to pull a ship off course and move it from one side of the ocean to the other.

Once in this current, it would be next to impossible for a ship without a motor to break free. There are two currents that originate off the coast of Africa and flow west to the Americas.

The two currents are the Guinea Current and the Canary Current. This current along with the N. Trade Winds would deliver a vessel at North America around the Bahamas Islands, which was right in the heart of the Olmec civilization.

There have been several important experiments with African boats and the Atlantic currents. Starting inDr. Alain Bombard sailed from Casablanca to Barbados in an African raft. Both journeys were made alone and the men arrived in good health.

The ships were built out of papyrus and were constructed the way they would have been during the Pre-Columbian era.They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America (Journal of African Civilizations) [Ivan Van Sertima] on timberdesignmag.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

They Came Before Columbus reveals a compelling, dramatic, and superbly detailed documentation of the presence and legacy of Africans in ancient America/5().

They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America. This book makes it possible for us to see clearly the unmistakable face and handprint of Black Africans in Pre-Columbian America, and their overwhelming impact .

This article will attempt to lay the foundation for African presence in the Americas before the arrival of Columbus, not as slaves, but as explorers and traders who helped to build the Olmec civilization. African Presence in Ancient America before Columbus This video’s purpose is to stress to Africans in America and the world that our history did not start with slavery in the New World.

The Ancient Ancestors of. This book was incredible and to sum it up in a nutshell from Sertima's own words, "The African presence in America before Columbus is of importance not only to African and American history but to the history of world civilizations/5.

In truth, Africans began coming to the Americas thousands of years before Columbus; and the evidence of their presence, though systematically ignored by mainstream scholars, is overwhelming and undeniable.

Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact theories - Wikipedia